Florence Schmieg, Ph.D.

Teaching

  • BISC 100 - Freshman Seminar
  • BISC 207 - Introductory Biology, semester one: This is the first semester of the survey course in Introductory Biology for Biology majors and other science-oriented majors that require some facility with the Biological Sciences. It consists of both traditional lectures and problem-based-learning. A "hands-on" laboratory is also part of the course.
  • BISC 401 - Molecular Biology of the Cell. This is the core course for majors in the Biological Sciences.
  • BISC 401 Honors - Molecular Biology of the Cell. The content material of this course is similar to the non-Honors course.
  • BISC 411 - Experimental Molecular Biology of the Cell. This is a 3 hour inquiry-based laboratory course designed both to introduce modern techniques in Molecular Biology and to foster critical thinking and analysis in the design and evaluation of experiments in the field.
  • I am currently the chair of the Health Sciences Advisement and Evaluation Committee of the University of Delaware. As such, I serve as the faculty advisor for students with an interest in pursuing careers in medicine. Students are encouraged to read the information currently online for advice in planning their undergraduate programs and for a description of the University's evaluation process.

Research Interests

In 1998 I switched the focus of my research from basic laboratory research to research in Science Education. My emphasis is on evaluating group-interactive approaches in undergraduate classrooms. Specifically, I am studying the effect of Problem-Based-Learning strategies on educational outcomes and student attitudes in two courses, Molecular Biology of the Cell and Introductory Biology. The studies thus far have evaluated student progress on learning objectives as self-reported in end-of-term evaluations and have measured correlations of the same to parameters such as the student's previous experience with Problem-Based-Learning and the level of the class (upper class or Freshman).

The next step this research will take is the evaluation of student learning and critical thinking skills in these courses to determine if these pedagogical approaches improve retention and the ability of students to apply learning to novel situations and to make connections.

A second interest is in the design of novel, inquiry-based laboratory investigations in Molecular Biology. These laboratories would progress gradually toward student-generated projects. These laboratory investigations will contain both wet-lab activities as well as computer data base analysis. I plan to evaluate the outcome of these approaches in the laboratory on student learning and attitudes towards science as I currently do for the classroom activities described above.

A third interest is in premedical education. I chair the Health Science Advisement and Evaluation Committee at the University. As such, I have developed an interest in examining the curricular and extracurricular experiences that lead to the formation of caring, successful physicians to help fulfill the needs of the country in the decades ahead.

My previous laboratory research interest was in the mechanisms by which mammalian cells control their growth. Specifically, I studied the structure-function relationships of the tumor-suppressor protein p53. This important cellular protein is involved in regulating cell-cycle events that protect cells with damaged DNA from replicating and accumulating mutations. It is also involved in triggering a cellular response called apoptosis (programmed cell death) that causes damaged cells to commit a form of suicide, thus protecting the organism in which these cells reside. Cells allowed to divide with DNA damage can ultimately become malignant cells.

Selected Publications

Other Information

Presentations

  • Florence I. Schmieg. "Using Debates to Connect Biological Concepts to Current Issues of Importance to Society", Poster presentation at the Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching-D.C., Evidence-Based Learning and Teaching, Washington, D.C., June 2-5, 2011.
  • Florence I. Schmieg. Using Debates to Link Scientific Concepts with Real World Applications in Introductory Biology and Molecular Cell Biology Courses. Poster presentation at the 108th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, Boston, Massachusetts, June 1-5, 2008.
  • Florence I. Schmieg.Blending Student Writing and Oral Communication with Laboratory Experience in an Experimental Molecular Biology Course. Poster presentation at the American Society for Microbiology 107th General Meeting, May 21-25, 2007, Toronto, Canada.
  • Florence I. Schmieg. Using T4 Lysozyme as a Model Organism in an Experimental Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory for Undergraduates. Poster presentation at the meeting, Experimental Biology 2005, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Annual Meeting, March 31- April 5, 2005. San Diego, California.
  • Florence I. Schmieg. Using T4 Lysozyme as a Model Organism in an Experimental Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory Course. Poster presentation at the 104th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, May 23-27, 2004, New Orleans, Louisiana.
  • Florence I.Schmieg, K. McCaffrey, and H. Hannah. The Impact of Living-Learning Communities on the Academic Performance of First Semester Freshmen in Introductory Biology and Chemistry Courses at the University of Delaware. 103rd General Meeting, American Society for Microbiology, May 18-22, 2003, Washington Convention Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Florence I. Schmieg. Analysis of Student Responses to and Academic Impact of a Learning Integrated Freshman Experience Centered around a Biotechnology/Bioinformatics Theme. Poster Presentation. 102nd General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, May 19-23, 2002. Salt Palace Convention Center, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  • Florence I. Schmieg. Assessment of Problem-Based Learning in Large Classes: Faculty and Student Perspectives. Invited speaker at the symposium on Assessing Student Learning. 101st General Meeting of the American Society of Microbiology, May 20-25, 2001, Orlando, Florida.
  • Florence Schmieg, Juqiao Zhao, George Molloy, and Daniel T. Simmons. 1992. Properties of p53 Mutants with Single-Point Substitution Mutations in Conserved Region II. The 6th p53 Workshop, Tiberias, Israel, November 1-5, 1992.
  • DuPont Merck Pharmaceuticals Co., Wilmington, Delaware. April 12, 1992. Oral presentation to the Cancer Research group. Analysis of p53 proteins with changes in conserved region II.
  • Florence I. Schmieg and Daniel T. Simmons 1987. Construction and analysis of p53 mutants with changes in conserved region II: Evidence for a role in T antigen binding. The Fifth Annual p53 Workshop, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, June 1987.

Abstracts

  • Florence I. Schmieg. 2000. Analysis of Student Work and Evaluations of Problem-Based-Learning in Large Undergraduate Introductory and Molecular Cell Biology Courses. Abstracts of the 100th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, Los Angeles, California, May 21-25, 2000.
  • Florence I. Schmieg. 1999. Use and Analysis of Problem-Based and Group-Interactive Approaches in Undergraduate Education. Abstracts of the 99th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, Chicago, Illinois, May 30-June 3, 1999.
  • Florence I. Schmieg, Margaret Rohrbaugh, N. Logsdon, J. Huang, and Daniel Simmons. 1997. Mutational Analysis of a p53 domain implicated in the inhibition of transformation and the induction of apoptosis in embryonic cells. Abstracts of the Cancer Genetics and Tumor Suppressor Genes Conference, Foundation for Advanced Cancer Studies, Frederick Cancer Institute, NIH. Hood College, Frederick, Maryland, June 12-16, 1997.
  • Florence I. Schmieg, N. Logsdon, R. Felix, and D. Simmons. 1996. Evidence that amino acids 127 through 133 of mouse p53 define a domain important for the inhibition of transformation. Abstracts of the 8th International p53 Workshop. University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland, July 5-9, 1996.
  • Florence I. Schmieg, N. Logsdon, R. Felix, J. Zhao, G. Molloy, and D. Simmons. 1994. Analysis of the DNA binding, oligomerization, and transactivation activities of p53 proteins with changes in conserved region II. Abstracts of the 7th International p53 Workshop. Ontario Cancer Institute, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada. June 19-22, 1994.
  • Deborah Freedman and Florence I. Schmieg. Analysis of the biochemical and transformation-related properties of mutant p53 tumor-suppressor proteins. 1993. Abstracts of the Symposium on Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, July, 1993.
  • Florence I. Schmieg, J. Zhao, J. Lin, G. Molloy, and D.T. Simmons. 1992. Analysis of mouse p53 proteins with amino acid changes in conserved region II. Abstracts of the 8th meeting on Oncogenes, Foundation for Advanced Cancer Studies, Frederick Cancer Institute, NIH. Hood College, Frederick, Maryland, June 23-27, 1992.
  • Florence I. Schmieg, M. Missera, and J. Sawicki. 1988. Effects of elevated c-mos transfection on differentiation and tumorigenesis. Abstracts of the 1988 Mouse Molecular Genetics Meeting. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York, August 21-26, 1988.
  • Florence I. Schmieg and Daniel T. Simmons. 1987. Characterization of the in vitro interaction between SV40 T Antigen and p53: Mapping the p53 binding site. Abstracts of the 1988 Meeting of the Imperial Cancer Research Fund: Adenoviruses, Papovaviruses, and Polyomaviruses. Cambridge University, Cambridge, England, July, 1987.
  • Florence I. Schmieg and Daniel T. Simmons. 1984. Intracellular location and kinetics of complex formation between SV40 T antigen and p53. Abstracts of the 1984 Tumor Virus Meeting on SV40, Polyoma, and Adenoviruses. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York, August 15-19, 1984.

Associate Professor

Phone: (302) 831-3533

Fax: (302) 831-2281

Email: fschmieg@udel.edu

Office: 242 Wolf Hall

Address:
Department of Biological Sciences
Wolf Hall
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716

Education

  • B.S., Ph.D. - University of Delaware
  • Postdoctoral - Wistar Institute of the University of Pennsylvania